Organic Gardening

Got Dirt? Give Thanks

Thanksgiving dinner is a rare American meal, and not just because it’s an annual event celebrated with family and friends, but also because this day of gratitude tends to spin off the yummiest leftovers, so thankfully little ends up as food scraps.

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Why Choose Organic
When It’s Not Food?

by guest blogger Jeroen Koeman, of EcoTulips. Until three years ago, I thought that growing with chemicals was “normal” and that it was the only way to farm. I can say now that I was quite brainwashed and did not realize the dangers of pesticides.

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Beautyberry:
Fall Color at its Finest

The seductive combination of intrigue, history, and utility is why beautyberry is one of those plants that make autumn tolerable for me. So let me tell you a bit about it.

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Compostology 1-2-3

by Therese Ciesinski, managing editor of Organic Gardening There’s a topic most organic gardeners, and particularly Organic Gardening readers, never tire of, and that’s compost. It seems we can never write enough about it. So I’m excited to announce that Organic Gardening magazine has published its first e-book, about—what else?—our favorite subject. Compostology 1-2-3 covers, […]

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Barefoot in the Garden

Ethne Clarke asked what kind of boots I wear for gardening. Boots? What boots? My favorite thing of all is gardening in bare feet, the soles of my calloused feet directly connects my soul to the warm, wet, highly textured earth…it’s like a whole new 7th sense of summer experienced through my toes, like prehensile […]

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Fresh Local Tomatoes All Year Long

by guest blogger Wendy Gordon “Once you’ve tried fresh tomatoes, you’ll never go back,” Bing Wright tells me.  A neighbor of mine in the Catskill Mountains, where frost in May and September is not unusual, Bing grows tomatoes by the bushel in a 20-by-30-foot vegetable patch. From that small garden, he can harvest and put […]

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The First Ever National Heirloom
Exposition, Santa Rosa, California

by guest blogger Annie Spiegelman (a.k.a. the Dirt Diva) It’s estimated that 75 percent of the processed foods in U.S. supermarkets contain genetically engineered (GE) ingredients. This manipulation occurs by taking a specific gene of one species, let’s say a flounder, and inserting it into another, such as a tomato, or inserting a bacterium into […]

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Beth Terry’s Plastic-Free Gardening
Adventure, Part 5

by guest blogger Beth Terry I’ve been dedicated to living a life plastic free, and experimenting this summer with starting up a garden. This post is one of many in a series describing my successes and struggles keeping plastic out of my garden. (If you’re new to this series, check out my first three posts about […]

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